What Are the Names of the 7 Devils? (The 7 Princes of Hell

By Paul King •  Updated: 10/15/23 •  18 min read

In the realm of esoteric knowledge, there is a profound interest in the names of the seven devils, often referred to as the seven princes of hell. These figures, deeply rooted in myth and religious lore, have captivated the minds of scholars, theologians, and curious individuals throughout history. Let us embark on a journey to uncover the identities of these infernal entities, drawing upon biblical texts and stories to shed light on their existence.

  1. Lucifer: Known as the ‘Morning Star’ or ‘Lightbearer,’ Lucifer was once an angel of great beauty and wisdom. However, his pride led him to rebel against God, and he was cast out of heaven. In the book of Isaiah 14:12-15, it is written, ‘How you have fallen from heaven, morning star, son of the dawn! You have been cast down to the earth, you who once laid low the nations! You said in your heart, ‘I will ascend to the heavens; I will raise my throne above the stars of God; I will sit enthroned on the mount of assembly, on the utmost heights of Mount Zaphon. I will ascend above the tops of the clouds; I will make myself like the Most High.’ But you are brought down to the realm of the dead, to the depths of the pit.’

  2. Mammon: Mammon is the personification of material wealth and greed. In the Gospel of Matthew 6:24, it is stated, ‘No one can serve two masters. Either you will hate the one and love the other, or you will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and money.’ Mammon represents the temptation and allure of worldly riches, which can distract individuals from their spiritual path.

  3. Asmodeus: Asmodeus is a demon associated with lust, particularly in the Book of Tobit. In Tobit 3:8, it is mentioned, ‘Asmodeus, the worst of demons, had fallen in love with Sarah, the daughter of Raguel, and fiercely proposed to have her.’ Asmodeus is often depicted as a seducer, tempting individuals to indulge in sinful desires.

  4. Leviathan: Leviathan is a powerful sea monster mentioned in the Book of Job and other biblical texts. It symbolizes chaos and represents the forces of evil. In Job 41:1-4, it is written, ‘Can you pull in Leviathan with a fishhook or tie down its tongue with a rope? Can you put a cord through its nose or pierce its jaw with a hook? Will it keep begging you for mercy? Will it speak to you with gentle words? Will it make an agreement with you for you to take it as your slave for life?’

  5. Beelzebub: Beelzebub, also known as ‘Lord of the Flies,’ is often associated with the prince of demons. In the New Testament, Jesus is accused of casting out demons by the power of Beelzebub. In Matthew 12:24, it is written, ‘But when the Pharisees heard this, they said, ‘It is only by Beelzebul, the prince of demons, that this fellow drives out demons.”

  6. Satan: Satan, also referred to as the devil, is one of the most recognizable figures in religious literature. He is depicted as the ultimate adversary of God and humanity. In the book of Job, Satan challenges God’s righteousness and tests Job’s faith. Satan’s name means ‘adversary’ or ‘accuser,’ reflecting his role as a tempter and deceiver.

  7. Belphegor: Belphegor is a demon associated with sloth and idleness. While not explicitly mentioned in the Bible, Belphegor has been referenced in various religious texts and folklore. This demon is said to tempt individuals into laziness and apathy, hindering their spiritual growth.

By exploring the origins and characteristics of these malevolent beings through biblical references, we gain a deeper understanding of the complex tapestry of religious beliefs and symbolisms associated with them. It is important to approach these subjects with discernment and a reverence for the sacred texts that provide insights into the realm of the supernatural.

Key Takeaways

Lucifer

Lucifer, also known as Satan or the Devil, holds a significant role in religious and mythological traditions. In Christian theology, Lucifer is seen as the fallen angel who rebelled against God. The Bible describes his downfall in Isaiah 14:12-15, where it states, ‘How you have fallen from heaven, morning star, son of the dawn! You have been cast down to the earth, you who once laid low the nations! You said in your heart, ‘I will ascend to the heavens; I will raise my throne above the stars of God; I will sit enthroned on the mount of assembly, on the utmost heights of Mount Zaphon. I will ascend above the tops of the clouds; I will make myself like the Most High.’ But you are brought down to the realm of the dead, to the depths of the pit.’

This passage reveals Lucifer’s prideful desire to elevate himself above God, which led to his downfall and expulsion from heaven. It emphasizes the consequences of rebellion against divine authority. The story of Lucifer serves as a cautionary tale, warning against the dangers of arrogance and disobedience.

In other religious traditions, such as Gnosticism and some interpretations of Satanism, Lucifer is viewed differently. He is seen as a symbol of enlightenment and knowledge. This perspective stems from the Latin meaning of ‘Lucifer’ as ‘light-bringer’ or ‘morning star.’ In this context, Lucifer represents the pursuit of personal growth, illumination, and the quest for hidden truths.

However, it is important to note that these interpretations differ from the mainstream Christian perspective. The Bible portrays Lucifer as an adversary of God, the embodiment of evil and temptation. In the New Testament, Jesus himself refers to Satan as ‘the father of lies’ (John 8:44) and warns against his deceitful nature.

Understanding the various interpretations of Lucifer’s role in different religions provides insight into the complexities and diversity of religious beliefs and interpretations. It highlights the importance of studying religious texts and understanding their context to grasp the full meaning and implications of these figures.

Moving forward, let us delve into the significance of another prominent figure in hell, Mammon.

Mammon

Associated with the sin of greed, Mammon holds significant importance in biblical texts as it is associated with wealth and greed. In Matthew 6:24, Jesus warns against serving both God and Mammon, stating, ‘No one can serve two masters. Either you will hate the one and love the other, or you will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and money.’ This highlights the dangers of prioritizing material wealth over spiritual well-being.

One biblical story that exemplifies the consequences of greed is the tale of the rich young ruler found in Mark 10:17-27. This story recounts a wealthy man who approaches Jesus, asking what he must do to inherit eternal life. Jesus tells him to sell all his possessions, give to the poor, and follow Him. However, the man becomes sad because he is unwilling to part with his great wealth. Jesus then remarks, ‘How hard it is for the rich to enter the kingdom of God! It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.’

Throughout history, cultural representations of Mammon in literature and art have further emphasized the dangers of greed and the pursuit of material possessions. In medieval allegorical texts and Renaissance paintings, Mammon is often depicted as a figure embodying the relentless pursuit of wealth at the expense of spiritual values. These representations serve as cautionary reminders of the potential dangers and moral pitfalls associated with an unchecked desire for riches.

Asmodeus

Asmodeus, known as the ruling prince of Hell, holds a significant place in demonology and religious mythology. This discussion aims to explore the multifaceted nature of Asmodeus, examining both his role as the ruling prince and the symbolic representation he embodies.

Asmodeus: Hell’s Ruling Prince

In demonology, Asmodeus is recognized as one of the ruling princes of Hell. The Bible describes him as a powerful and influential demon, often associated with lust and temptation. In the book of Tobit, Asmodeus is portrayed as the demon who kills seven husbands of Sarah before they can consummate their marriages. This story serves as a cautionary tale about the destructive nature of lust and the consequences it can have on relationships.

The Bible warns against giving in to sinful desires and urges individuals to resist the temptations of the devil. In 1 Peter 5:8, it states, ‘Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour.’ This verse emphasizes the need for constant vigilance against the lure of lust and the importance of staying rooted in faith.

Asmodeus’ association with lust highlights the biblical teachings on the importance of maintaining moral conduct. In Matthew 5:28, Jesus says, ‘But I tell you that anyone who looks at a woman lustfully has already committed adultery with her in his heart.’ This verse emphasizes the need to guard one’s thoughts and desires, recognizing that even thoughts of lust can lead to sinful actions.

The symbolic representations of Asmodeus, such as his three heads, can be seen as a reflection of his knowledge of human weaknesses. The Bible acknowledges the existence of spiritual warfare and the devil’s schemes to exploit these weaknesses. Ephesians 6:12 states, ‘For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms.’ This verse reminds believers to rely on God’s strength to resist temptation and to be aware of the enemy’s tactics.

Asmodeus: Symbolic Representation Explained

The symbolic representations of Asmodeus, such as his three heads, provide insight into the complexity of his character and the multifaceted nature of the human weaknesses he exploits. Asmodeus, known by various names in different cultures, has played a significant role in literature and mythology, including the Bible.

In the book of Tobit in the Bible, Asmodeus is portrayed as a demon who plagued Sarah, the daughter of Raguel, causing the death of her seven husbands on their wedding nights. This story illustrates Asmodeus’ role in tempting humans to engage in lustful activities and the destructive consequences that can follow.

In the book of James 1:14-15, it is written, ‘But each person is tempted when they are dragged away by their own evil desire and enticed. Then, after desire has conceived, it gives birth to sin; and sin, when it is full-grown, gives birth to death.’ This verse emphasizes the dangers of succumbing to temptations, highlighting the relevance of Asmodeus’ symbolic representation.

Furthermore, in the book of Proverbs 14:30, it states, ‘A heart at peace gives life to the body, but envy rots the bones.’ This biblical verse connects Asmodeus with the sin of envy, further emphasizing his role in exploiting human weaknesses.

In Christian literature, Asmodeus is often portrayed as the demon of wrath and represents the destructive power of vengeance. The Bible warns against seeking revenge and encourages forgiveness. Romans 12:19 states, ‘Do not take revenge, my dear friends, but leave room for God’s wrath, for it is written: ‘It is mine to avenge; I will repay,’ says the Lord.’

Understanding the symbolic meaning of Asmodeus in different cultures allows for a deeper exploration of the human condition and the consequences of succumbing to temptation. It serves as a reminder to remain vigilant against our own weaknesses and to rely on God’s guidance and grace to resist the allure of sin.

Transitioning to the subsequent section about ‘leviathan,’ another intriguing figure with its own symbolic significance, we find another biblical creature that holds deep meaning and lessons for humanity.

Leviathan

Leviathan, one of the seven princes of hell, holds great significance in various religious and mythological traditions. The biblical texts describe Leviathan as a fearsome and monstrous sea creature, embodying chaos and representing the forces of evil. In the book of Job, it is written, ‘Can you draw out Leviathan with a fishhook or press down his tongue with a cord?… No one is so fierce that he dares to stir him up’ (Job 41:1, 10).

Furthermore, in the book of Psalms, Leviathan is mentioned as a symbol of God’s dominion over the sea and His power to overcome evil. It states, ‘You divided the sea by your might; you broke the heads of the sea monsters on the waters. You crushed the heads of Leviathan; you gave him as food for the creatures of the wilderness’ (Psalm 74:13-14).

Leviathan’s representation as a primordial creature in Jewish folklore aligns with the biblical narrative. It symbolizes the ultimate defeat of evil and the power of God. This belief is reflected in Isaiah 27:1, where it says, ‘In that day the LORD with his hard and great and strong sword will punish Leviathan the fleeing serpent, Leviathan the twisting serpent, and he will slay the dragon that is in the sea.’

The significance of Leviathan can also be traced back to ancient Mesopotamian texts, where it is depicted as a monstrous sea serpent associated with chaos and destruction. The parallel between these ancient depictions and biblical accounts further emphasizes humanity’s fascination with the mysterious and destructive forces of the sea.

Turning our attention to Beelzebub, another one of the seven princes of hell, we enter the realm of demonic hierarchy. In the Bible, Beelzebub is referred to as the ‘prince of demons’ (Matthew 12:24) and is associated with idolatry and false gods. The name Beelzebub translates to ‘Lord of the Flies,’ symbolizing the corruption and decay that accompanies the worship of false idols.

In the book of Mark, Jesus encounters a man possessed by an unclean spirit who refers to himself as ‘Legion, for we are many’ (Mark 5:9). Jesus commands the unclean spirits to leave the man and they beg to enter a nearby herd of pigs. As the spirits enter the pigs, the entire herd rushes down a steep bank into the sea and drowns (Mark 5:13). This powerful story highlights Jesus’ authority over demons and their ultimate defeat.

Beelzebub

Beelzebub, also referred to as the ‘Lord of the Flies,’ holds a significant role in biblical texts as a symbol of idolatry and false gods. In Matthew 12:24, the Pharisees accused Jesus of casting out demons by the power of Beelzebub. This association with demonic forces highlights the negative connotations attached to Beelzebub’s name.

Furthermore, in literature, Beelzebub often represents the embodiment of evil and the temptations that divert individuals from the righteous path. One biblical story that exemplifies this concept is the temptation of Jesus in the wilderness. In Matthew 4:1-11, Satan tempts Jesus three times, offering him worldly pleasures and power. This narrative emphasizes the dangers of succumbing to temptation and serves as a warning against the consequences of idolatry.

Within the realm of demonology, Beelzebub is depicted as a high-ranking demon, sometimes recognized as one of the seven princes of Hell. This classification is derived from various interpretations of religious texts and literature. For instance, in John Milton’s epic poem, Paradise Lost, Beelzebub is portrayed as Satan’s second-in-command, reflecting his significant role in the hierarchy of Hell.

Drawing from the holy bible concordance, we can find further insight into the significance of Beelzebub. In 2 Kings 1:2-3, King Ahaziah of Israel falls ill and sends messengers to inquire of Baal-zebub, the god of Ekron, whether he will recover. However, the prophet Elijah intercepts the messengers and rebukes their reliance on a false god, proclaiming that there is no need to seek guidance from Beelzebub when there is the true God who can provide answers.

The presence of Beelzebub in both religious and literary texts invites readers to reflect on their own desires and weaknesses. It urges individuals to resist the allure of false gods and remain steadfast in their faith. By examining the consequences of idolatry and the temptations that lead individuals astray, we can gain a deeper understanding of the importance of remaining faithful to the teachings of the Bible.

Transitioning into the subsequent section about Satan, we delve deeper into the realm of demonic entities and their significance in religious and literary contexts. Through exploring additional biblical stories and literary references, we can further comprehend the role of these entities in shaping our understanding of good and evil.

Satan

Satan, a prominent figure in both religious and literary texts, plays a pivotal role in shaping our understanding of the age-old battle between good and evil. The Bible provides us with key insights into Satan’s character and his significance in this eternal struggle.

  1. Satan and Lucifer: While the terms Satan and Lucifer are often used interchangeably, they do have distinct roles within the devil hierarchy. In Isaiah 14:12-15, it is written, ‘How you are fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning!… For you have said in your heart: ‘I will ascend into heaven, I will exalt my throne above the stars of God… I will ascend above the heights of the clouds, I will be like the Most High.” This passage portrays Lucifer as a fallen angel who rebelled against God’s authority and sought to elevate himself to a position equal to God’s. On the other hand, Satan, which means ‘adversary’ or ‘accuser,’ is often depicted as the tempter who challenges and opposes God’s divine plan.

  2. Satan and Beelzebub: In the Bible, Satan is frequently associated with evil and is depicted as the leader of fallen angels. In Matthew 12:24, the Pharisees accused Jesus of casting out demons by the power of Beelzebub, which means ‘lord of the flies’ or ‘lord of dung.’ Jesus, in response, said, ‘Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation, and every city or house divided against itself will not stand. If Satan casts out Satan, he is divided against himself. How then will his kingdom stand?’ This interaction further emphasizes Satan’s role as the embodiment of evil and the leader of demonic forces.

By delving into the Bible and its teachings, we can gain a deeper understanding of the complex nature of Satan and his counterparts. These mythical figures serve as cautionary symbols, reminding us of the consequences of rebellion and the importance of remaining steadfast in our faith.

The Bible provides us with stories and teachings that shed light on the significance of these figures, guiding us in our spiritual journey and strengthening our understanding of the battle between good and evil. As we explore further, we will uncover the next devil in our discussion, Belphegor, and the lessons we can learn from this intriguing character.

Belphegor

One specific devil that holds significance within religious and literary texts is Belphegor, who is often portrayed as an emblem of sloth and laziness. Belphegor is a prominent figure in demonology, representing the sin of idleness and the temptation to waste one’s time and talents.

In the Holy Bible, we can find verses that warn against the dangers of sloth and laziness. Proverbs 24:30-34 states, ‘I went by the field of a sluggard, by the vineyard of a man lacking sense, and behold, it was all overgrown with thorns; the ground was covered with nettles, and its stone wall was broken down. Then I saw and considered it; I looked and received instruction. A little sleep, a little slumber, a little folding of the hands to rest, and poverty will come upon you like a robber, and want like an armed man.’

This story from the Bible serves as a cautionary tale, illustrating the consequences of laziness and the importance of diligence and hard work. Through the character of Belphegor, authors seek to emphasize the need to actively engage in productive and meaningful activities, rather than succumbing to the temptations of idleness.

In addition to the teachings of the Bible, there are other stories that further highlight the destructive consequences of laziness. For example, the parable of the talents in Matthew 25:14-30 tells the story of a master who entrusts his servants with different amounts of money. Two of the servants invest and multiply their talents, while one out of fear and laziness buries his talent in the ground. The master praises the first two servants but condemns the third for his inaction. This story serves as a reminder that we are called to use our God-given talents and not let them go to waste through laziness.

In literature, Belphegor serves as a symbolic representation of the dangers of sloth and the importance of actively pursuing meaningful endeavors. Authors draw upon biblical teachings and stories to reinforce these messages, urging readers to avoid the path of idleness and instead embrace diligence and hard work.

Paul King

I post written versions of my powerful sermons exploring topics like prayer, praise, biblical truths, and more expressions of faith. My church has a deeply spiritual culture, which I try to convey through vivid storytelling and applications in our everyday life. I spread the Good Word with lots of conviction and passion.
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